Wildlife & Exotic Species

Even when habitat is present for native wildlife, animal populations can be seriously impacted, or even eliminated, as a result of the introduction of exotic or non-native species. Exotic plants and animals are mainly introduced in an area by people. For example, about 25 million homes in the US have exotic birds as pets –…

Wildlife Diseases & Habitat Quality

There is a strong correlation between wildlife diseases and their habitats. Today we’ll discuss those diseases and how what’s surrounding them can contribute. More importantly, we’ll also go over diseases that can be passed to us humans and what we can do to prevent them. Before we get started, here are some concepts to keep…

Types of Wildlife Mortality

As a follow up from the last post, today we’ll go over the different types of wildlife mortality. There are many different ways your animals can die, when we discuss these ways, you can see how to prevent these types of mortality as much as possible. Starvation and Malnutrition: Starvation is death or debilitation caused…

Wildlife Mortality Concepts

There are many types of mortality that wildlife can succumb to. Mortality is merely the cause of death; some being normal and others abnormal. Today we will discuss the differences between the two and the general concepts of mortality that can damage your wildlife populations. Normal Mortality vs. Abnormal Mortality Normal Mortality: Types of mortality…

Edge Habitat

An important component to overall habitat health is called EDGE.ย  Edge is the transition zone, or ecotone, where one type of plant community “gives way” to another plant community. Wildlife managers like edge because it provides animals with simultaneous access to 2 or more vegetation types – where its likely several welfare factors are located….